Grant Hart’s The Argument: A Masterpiece for a Post-Hüsker Dü World

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As a disclosure, let me state that I am the director of the Grant Hart documentary EVERY EVERYTHING.

But that said, if I didn’t truly love this record I would write nothing at all.

As even my closest friends know, if they ask for an opinion from me, I will give it to them truthfully. I’m not one to sugarcoat, or ever tell people what they want to hear.

Next, so you know where I stand, I believe these to be indisputable facts: 

1. Hüsker Dü and The Replacements are the two most important rock bands of the past 35 years–that every single band that picked up a guitar and rocked post 1987 owes everything to these two bands. They saved rock and roll at a time when even punk had completely lost its edge and became new wave. So that is the regard in which I hold the members of these two bands. 

2. Just as the Beatles had two great singer/songwriters in Lennon and McCartney, Hüsker Dü had Mould and Hart. There is no Hüsker Dü without Grant Hart. He is as important to the band as Mould, and just as good a songwriter. As for their post-Hüsker Dü careers, Hart might not have been as prolific, but he delivered “2541″ and “The Main,” which for me are the two best post-breakup songs. 

Now, on to The Argument.

This is a vast, impressive work. Hardly a collection of pop tunes that you can play on your car’s stereo system and listen to at leisure…at least not at first. In taking on Paradise Lost, a book most of us could not even get through the CliffsNotes on, Hart has given us a true rock opera, about good vs. evil, about heaven vs. hell, about lust and the snake in the garden. This is a post-punk rock bible, a Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars or Tommy for our day. But the first half dozen times through you need to listen. To absorb. To take in the grandeur of what he’s accomplished.

And only then you will find the pop songs.

The rock songs.

The songs to break your heart.

Then you will begin to see the scope of The Argument. Then you will begin to see the influences Hart wears proudly on his sleeve, from an almost polished version of the noise we came to love as Hüsker Dü fans to nods towards Dylan (“For Those Too High Aspiring” is probably my favorite track, sounding like a lost track Dylan contributed to Zen Arcade), the Doors (“Golden Chain”), the Faces (“Shine, Shine, Shine”), Buddy Holly (“Letting Me Out”), doo wop (“So Far From Heaven”), anthem rock (“Glorious,” which would make for a perfect very tongue-in-cheek Christian rock anthem), even a Rudy Vallée ukulele ditty (“Underneath the Apple Tree”), and yes, old Bowie (the brilliant title track). Hart is a walking history-of-music encyclopedia, and that knowledge shines through on every track. 

The production is masterful. (The use of the beep from Sputnik on “Is the Sky the Limit” is a stroke of genius.) Hart’s voice is powerful when it needs to be. Frail, almost cracked, when he wants to rip out your heart. The instrumentation is at times a cacophony of blessed noise pop and at other times brisk, clean, clear. There are moments when a track ends and you actually wish for a breather before what will assault you next. 

To take on Milton’s “Paradise Lost” might have seemed a fool’s game for most musicians. But Grant Hart isn’t like most musicians. He’s probably one of the smartest men in rock & roll. And while this might have been a glorious gamble that ended badly, he’s hit the jackpot. But no more so than the fans who get to experience this work of art. 

Should you buy it? Well, I’ll answer that question with a question: would you go see Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” if it was in a gallery in your town? If the answer is yes,it’s because you have to see the genius in Van Gogh’s swirls in person and for yourself. Then, yes, buy “The Argument.” 

Masterpieces only come around every so often. 

Gorman Bechard is the director of the Grant Hart documentary EVERY EVERYTHING.

For more information: www.whatwerewethinkingfilms.com